Does the term “TOLAC” tweak you?

Does the term “TOLAC” tweak you?

On the acronym TOLAC (trial of labor after cesarean)….

Some studies break out statistics in four ways.

1. ERCS/D (elective repeat cesarean section/ delivery)
2. VBAC (vaginal birth after cesarean)
3. CBAC (cesarean birth after cesarean aka cesarean after planned VBAC)
4. TOLAC (VBAC + CBAC stats)

Because we are unable to predict who will have a VBAC or CBAC, the TOLAC stat enables us to review outcomes from a variety of angles:

  • TOLAC vs. ERCS
  • VBAC vs. ERCS
  • CBAC vs. ERCS

Some women find the TOLAC acronym offensive, because it implies “trying,” so practitioners sensitive to this may way to use the phrase “planning a VBAC.”   Understanding that TOLAC isn’t a dig at moms, but just a straightforward, objective term that care providers use, can (hopefully) take the sting out of the word.

Remember, your care provider is not your girlfriend.  They use clinical terms because that is the language of their world. They speak like clinicians because they are clinicians. All that said, providers who are aware of how the term TOLAC is received by some women use the term “planned VBAC.”

So moms, you use the language that works for you! Just remember that TOLAC is really more of a clinical term and when your provider uses it, it doesn’t necessarily mean that they are a jerk.  They just may have forgotten to code switch from clinical to sensitive language.

Moms don’t typically say, “I’m so excited for my TOLAC!” However, if you do, you might make your provider laugh and connect with them on a human level.

What do you think? Leave a comment.

Jen Kamel

Jen Kamel is the founder of VBAC Facts, an educational, training and consulting firm. As a nationally recognized VBAC strategist and consumer advocate, she has been invited to present Grand Rounds at hospitals, served as an expert witness in a legal proceeding, and has traveled the country educating hundreds of professionals and highly motivated parents. She speaks at national conferences and has worked as a legislative consultant in various states focusing on midwifery legislation and regulations. She has testified multiple times in front of the California Medical Board and legislative committees on the importance of VBAC access and is a board member for the California Association of Midwives.

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